8,

Severe Weather

Current Watches and Warnings

More Maps

South Carolina, Hampton

Hurricane Statement

Statement as of 5:42 AM EDT on May 28, 2016

Expires 10:00 AM EDT on May 28, 2016


This product covers southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia

**depression has not strengthened yet**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Berkeley... inland Jasper... Beaufort... coastal
      Colleton... Charleston... coastal Jasper and tidal Berkeley

* storm information:
    - about 265 miles southeast of Charleston SC or about 280 miles
      east-southeast of Savannah GA
    - 29.9n 77.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 315 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical depression 2 continues to move toward the southeast coast
this morning. At 5 am... the depression was located about 265 miles
southeast of Charleston... or 280 miles east-southeast of Savannah. The
depression is expected to move northwest through tonight while slowing
down... possibly making landfall in or near Charleston County Sunday
afternoon as a very weak tropical storm. The system is then expected
to begin to pull away from the area Sunday night.

Weather conditions will steadily deteriorate this afternoon and
tonight as the depression begins to approaches the coast. Rain could
become locally heavy at times this afternoon through at least Sunday...
with 1 to 3 inches expected across southeast South Carolina. Locally
higher amounts will be possible... especially along the coast. There
will be a risk for minor flooding... mainly in low lying and poor
drainage areas near the South Carolina coast near the times of high
tide... but significant flash flooding is not expected at this time.
The amount of rain the area receives will be highly dependent on the
exact track and speed of the tropical depression.

The risk for tropical storm force wind gusts will be highest in rain
bands tonight through Sunday morning as the depression approaches and
then possibly moves over or near the lower South Carolina coast. The
area that is most likely to see tropical storm force winds gusts ...
potentially as high as 25 to 35 mph with higher gusts... will be along
the coastal areas of southeast South Carolina... including the
Charleston Metro area. Winds of this magnitude are capable of breaking
weak limbs... damaging weak structures... porches... shingles or siding
and blowing around light weight objects. Isolated power outages are
possible. Dangerous driving conditions could develop on elevated and
exposed bridges such as the Ravenel bridge... the Don Holt bridge... the
James Island connector and the Isle of Palms connector.

There will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast South Carolina and southeast
Georgia. Potential impacts include:
    - localized rainfall flooding could prompt a few evacuations.
    - Rivers and tributaries could quickly rise with swifter
      currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches could
      become swollen and overflow in spots.
    - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in normally
      vulnerable spots. Rapid ponding of water could occur at
      underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several
      storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to
      overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in this area include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - Some roads impassable due to debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways, especially for high
      profile vehicles.
    - Isolated to scattered power and communications outages.

Elsewhere across southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia,
little to no impact is anticipated.

* Other coastal hazards:
there will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------


* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Keep cell phones well charged and handy. Also, cell phone chargers
for automobiles can be helpful after the storm. Locate your chargers
and keep them with your cell phone.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Charleston SC around 12 noon EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Mte

542 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia

**depression has not strengthened yet**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Berkeley... inland Jasper... Beaufort... coastal
      Colleton... Charleston... coastal Jasper and tidal Berkeley

* storm information:
    - about 265 miles southeast of Charleston SC or about 280 miles
      east-southeast of Savannah GA
    - 29.9n 77.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 315 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical depression 2 continues to move toward the southeast coast
this morning. At 5 am... the depression was located about 265 miles
southeast of Charleston... or 280 miles east-southeast of Savannah. The
depression is expected to move northwest through tonight while slowing
down... possibly making landfall in or near Charleston County Sunday
afternoon as a very weak tropical storm. The system is then expected
to begin to pull away from the area Sunday night.

Weather conditions will steadily deteriorate this afternoon and
tonight as the depression begins to approaches the coast. Rain could
become locally heavy at times this afternoon through at least Sunday...
with 1 to 3 inches expected across southeast South Carolina. Locally
higher amounts will be possible... especially along the coast. There
will be a risk for minor flooding... mainly in low lying and poor
drainage areas near the South Carolina coast near the times of high
tide... but significant flash flooding is not expected at this time.
The amount of rain the area receives will be highly dependent on the
exact track and speed of the tropical depression.

The risk for tropical storm force wind gusts will be highest in rain
bands tonight through Sunday morning as the depression approaches and
then possibly moves over or near the lower South Carolina coast. The
area that is most likely to see tropical storm force winds gusts ...
potentially as high as 25 to 35 mph with higher gusts... will be along
the coastal areas of southeast South Carolina... including the
Charleston Metro area. Winds of this magnitude are capable of breaking
weak limbs... damaging weak structures... porches... shingles or siding
and blowing around light weight objects. Isolated power outages are
possible. Dangerous driving conditions could develop on elevated and
exposed bridges such as the Ravenel bridge... the Don Holt bridge... the
James Island connector and the Isle of Palms connector.

There will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast South Carolina and southeast
Georgia. Potential impacts include:
    - localized rainfall flooding could prompt a few evacuations.
    - Rivers and tributaries could quickly rise with swifter
      currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches could
      become swollen and overflow in spots.
    - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in normally
      vulnerable spots. Rapid ponding of water could occur at
      underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several
      storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to
      overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in this area include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - Some roads impassable due to debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways, especially for high
      profile vehicles.
    - Isolated to scattered power and communications outages.

Elsewhere across southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia,
little to no impact is anticipated.

* Other coastal hazards:
there will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------


* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Keep cell phones well charged and handy. Also, cell phone chargers
for automobiles can be helpful after the storm. Locate your chargers
and keep them with your cell phone.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Charleston SC around 12 noon EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Mte


542 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia

**depression has not strengthened yet**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Berkeley... inland Jasper... Beaufort... coastal
      Colleton... Charleston... coastal Jasper and tidal Berkeley

* storm information:
    - about 265 miles southeast of Charleston SC or about 280 miles
      east-southeast of Savannah GA
    - 29.9n 77.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 315 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical depression 2 continues to move toward the southeast coast
this morning. At 5 am... the depression was located about 265 miles
southeast of Charleston... or 280 miles east-southeast of Savannah. The
depression is expected to move northwest through tonight while slowing
down... possibly making landfall in or near Charleston County Sunday
afternoon as a very weak tropical storm. The system is then expected
to begin to pull away from the area Sunday night.

Weather conditions will steadily deteriorate this afternoon and
tonight as the depression begins to approaches the coast. Rain could
become locally heavy at times this afternoon through at least Sunday...
with 1 to 3 inches expected across southeast South Carolina. Locally
higher amounts will be possible... especially along the coast. There
will be a risk for minor flooding... mainly in low lying and poor
drainage areas near the South Carolina coast near the times of high
tide... but significant flash flooding is not expected at this time.
The amount of rain the area receives will be highly dependent on the
exact track and speed of the tropical depression.

The risk for tropical storm force wind gusts will be highest in rain
bands tonight through Sunday morning as the depression approaches and
then possibly moves over or near the lower South Carolina coast. The
area that is most likely to see tropical storm force winds gusts ...
potentially as high as 25 to 35 mph with higher gusts... will be along
the coastal areas of southeast South Carolina... including the
Charleston Metro area. Winds of this magnitude are capable of breaking
weak limbs... damaging weak structures... porches... shingles or siding
and blowing around light weight objects. Isolated power outages are
possible. Dangerous driving conditions could develop on elevated and
exposed bridges such as the Ravenel bridge... the Don Holt bridge... the
James Island connector and the Isle of Palms connector.

There will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast South Carolina and southeast
Georgia. Potential impacts include:
    - localized rainfall flooding could prompt a few evacuations.
    - Rivers and tributaries could quickly rise with swifter
      currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches could
      become swollen and overflow in spots.
    - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in normally
      vulnerable spots. Rapid ponding of water could occur at
      underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several
      storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to
      overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in this area include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - Some roads impassable due to debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways, especially for high
      profile vehicles.
    - Isolated to scattered power and communications outages.

Elsewhere across southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia,
little to no impact is anticipated.

* Other coastal hazards:
there will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------


* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Keep cell phones well charged and handy. Also, cell phone chargers
for automobiles can be helpful after the storm. Locate your chargers
and keep them with your cell phone.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Charleston SC around 12 noon EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Mte

542 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia

**depression has not strengthened yet**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Berkeley... inland Jasper... Beaufort... coastal
      Colleton... Charleston... coastal Jasper and tidal Berkeley

* storm information:
    - about 265 miles southeast of Charleston SC or about 280 miles
      east-southeast of Savannah GA
    - 29.9n 77.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 315 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical depression 2 continues to move toward the southeast coast
this morning. At 5 am... the depression was located about 265 miles
southeast of Charleston... or 280 miles east-southeast of Savannah. The
depression is expected to move northwest through tonight while slowing
down... possibly making landfall in or near Charleston County Sunday
afternoon as a very weak tropical storm. The system is then expected
to begin to pull away from the area Sunday night.

Weather conditions will steadily deteriorate this afternoon and
tonight as the depression begins to approaches the coast. Rain could
become locally heavy at times this afternoon through at least Sunday...
with 1 to 3 inches expected across southeast South Carolina. Locally
higher amounts will be possible... especially along the coast. There
will be a risk for minor flooding... mainly in low lying and poor
drainage areas near the South Carolina coast near the times of high
tide... but significant flash flooding is not expected at this time.
The amount of rain the area receives will be highly dependent on the
exact track and speed of the tropical depression.

The risk for tropical storm force wind gusts will be highest in rain
bands tonight through Sunday morning as the depression approaches and
then possibly moves over or near the lower South Carolina coast. The
area that is most likely to see tropical storm force winds gusts ...
potentially as high as 25 to 35 mph with higher gusts... will be along
the coastal areas of southeast South Carolina... including the
Charleston Metro area. Winds of this magnitude are capable of breaking
weak limbs... damaging weak structures... porches... shingles or siding
and blowing around light weight objects. Isolated power outages are
possible. Dangerous driving conditions could develop on elevated and
exposed bridges such as the Ravenel bridge... the Don Holt bridge... the
James Island connector and the Isle of Palms connector.

There will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast South Carolina and southeast
Georgia. Potential impacts include:
    - localized rainfall flooding could prompt a few evacuations.
    - Rivers and tributaries could quickly rise with swifter
      currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches could
      become swollen and overflow in spots.
    - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in normally
      vulnerable spots. Rapid ponding of water could occur at
      underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several
      storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to
      overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in this area include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - Some roads impassable due to debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways, especially for high
      profile vehicles.
    - Isolated to scattered power and communications outages.

Elsewhere across southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia,
little to no impact is anticipated.

* Other coastal hazards:
there will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------


* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Keep cell phones well charged and handy. Also, cell phone chargers
for automobiles can be helpful after the storm. Locate your chargers
and keep them with your cell phone.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Charleston SC around 12 noon EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Mte


154 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia

**depression has not strengthened yet**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Berkeley... inland Jasper... Beaufort... coastal
      Colleton... Charleston... coastal Jasper and tidal Berkeley

* storm information:
    - about 300 miles southeast of Charleston SC or about 330 miles
      east-southeast of Savannah GA
    - 29.5n 76.4w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement west-northwest or 300 degrees at 12 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Situation overview
---------------------

Tropical depression 2 continues to move toward the southeast coast
this morning. At 2 am... the depression was located about 300 miles
southeast of Charleston... or 330 miles east-southeast of Savannah. The
depression is expected to move northwest through Saturday night while
slowing down... possibly brushing the Charleston area as a weak
tropical storm Sunday afternoon as it begins to move more northward.
The system is expected to begin to pull away from the area Sunday
evening.

Weather conditions will steadily deteriorate Saturday night into
Sunday morning as the depression approaches the coast. Rain could
become locally heavy at times with as much as 1 to 2 inches
potentially falling across southeast South Carolina... with locally
higher amounts are possible especially along the Charleston and
Colleton County coasts. Mainly less than half an inch is expected to
fall across southeast Georgia. There will be a risk for minor
flooding... mainly in low lying and poor drainage areas... but
significant flash flooding is not expected at this time. The risk for
flooding will be highest in urban areas as well as coastal areas
during times of high tide. However... the amount of rain the area
receives will be highly dependent on the exact track the tropical
depression takes.

The risk for tropical storm force winds will be highest in rain bands
Saturday night through the day Sunday as the depression approaches the
lower South Carolina coast. The area that is most likely to see
tropical storm force winds... potentially as high as 30 to 40 mph with
higher gusts... will be along the coastal areas of southeast South
Carolina... including the Charleston Metro area. Winds of this
magnitude are capable of Downing weak trees and power lines and could
damage siding on some homes. Isolated power outages are possible.
Dangerous driving conditions could develop on elevated and exposed
bridges such as the Ravenel bridge... the Don Holt bridge... the James
Island connector and the Isle of Palms connector. No significant wind
impacts are expected across the remainder of southeast South Carolina
and southeast Georgia.

There will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast South Carolina and southeast
Georgia. Potential impacts include:
    - localized rainfall flooding could prompt a few evacuations.
    - Rivers and tributaries could quickly rise with swifter
      currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches could
      become swollen and overflow in spots.
    - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in normally
      vulnerable spots. Rapid ponding of water could occur at
      underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several
      storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to
      overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in this area include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - Some roads impassable due to debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways, especially for high
      profile vehicles.
    - Isolated to scattered power and communications outages.

Elsewhere across southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia,
little to no impact is anticipated.

* Other coastal hazards:
rip currents... there will be an increased for stronger and more frequent
rip currents at area beaches through the Holiday weekend. Some beach
erosion is likely.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Keep cell phones well charged and handy. Also, cell phone chargers
for automobiles can be helpful after the storm. Locate your chargers
and keep them with your cell phone.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Charleston SC around by 6am EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Mte

154 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia

**depression has not strengthened yet**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Berkeley... inland Jasper... Beaufort... coastal
      Colleton... Charleston... coastal Jasper and tidal Berkeley

* storm information:
    - about 300 miles southeast of Charleston SC or about 330 miles
      east-southeast of Savannah GA
    - 29.5n 76.4w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement west-northwest or 300 degrees at 12 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Situation overview
---------------------

Tropical depression 2 continues to move toward the southeast coast
this morning. At 2 am... the depression was located about 300 miles
southeast of Charleston... or 330 miles east-southeast of Savannah. The
depression is expected to move northwest through Saturday night while
slowing down... possibly brushing the Charleston area as a weak
tropical storm Sunday afternoon as it begins to move more northward.
The system is expected to begin to pull away from the area Sunday
evening.

Weather conditions will steadily deteriorate Saturday night into
Sunday morning as the depression approaches the coast. Rain could
become locally heavy at times with as much as 1 to 2 inches
potentially falling across southeast South Carolina... with locally
higher amounts are possible especially along the Charleston and
Colleton County coasts. Mainly less than half an inch is expected to
fall across southeast Georgia. There will be a risk for minor
flooding... mainly in low lying and poor drainage areas... but
significant flash flooding is not expected at this time. The risk for
flooding will be highest in urban areas as well as coastal areas
during times of high tide. However... the amount of rain the area
receives will be highly dependent on the exact track the tropical
depression takes.

The risk for tropical storm force winds will be highest in rain bands
Saturday night through the day Sunday as the depression approaches the
lower South Carolina coast. The area that is most likely to see
tropical storm force winds... potentially as high as 30 to 40 mph with
higher gusts... will be along the coastal areas of southeast South
Carolina... including the Charleston Metro area. Winds of this
magnitude are capable of Downing weak trees and power lines and could
damage siding on some homes. Isolated power outages are possible.
Dangerous driving conditions could develop on elevated and exposed
bridges such as the Ravenel bridge... the Don Holt bridge... the James
Island connector and the Isle of Palms connector. No significant wind
impacts are expected across the remainder of southeast South Carolina
and southeast Georgia.

There will be increased risk for stronger and more frequent rip
currents as well as beach erosion along the beaches of both southeast
South Carolina and southeast Georgia through the Holiday weekend.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast South Carolina and southeast
Georgia. Potential impacts include:
    - localized rainfall flooding could prompt a few evacuations.
    - Rivers and tributaries could quickly rise with swifter
      currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches could
      become swollen and overflow in spots.
    - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in normally
      vulnerable spots. Rapid ponding of water could occur at
      underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several
      storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to
      overflow. Some brief Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in this area include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - Some roads impassable due to debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways, especially for high
      profile vehicles.
    - Isolated to scattered power and communications outages.

Elsewhere across southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia,
little to no impact is anticipated.

* Other coastal hazards:
rip currents... there will be an increased for stronger and more frequent
rip currents at area beaches through the Holiday weekend. Some beach
erosion is likely.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Keep cell phones well charged and handy. Also, cell phone chargers
for automobiles can be helpful after the storm. Locate your chargers
and keep them with your cell phone.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Charleston SC around by 6am EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Mte

Weather Severe Map
Alaska - Fire Weather Watch , Record Report
Arizona - Air Quality Alert , Record Report
Arkansas - Flood Warning , Flood Advisory , Record Report
California - Freeze Warning
Colorado - Flash Flood Watch , Public Information Statement
Connecticut - Air Quality Alert , Special Statement, Air Quality Alert
Florida - Coastal Hazard Statement
Georgia - Hurricane Statement , Coastal Hazard Statement , Air Quality Alert
Iowa - Flood Warning , Special Statement
Kansas - Flood Warning , Areal Flood Warning , Areal Flood Warning , Flood Warning, Areal Flood Warning , Record Report , Public Information Statement
Louisiana - Flood Warning , Record Report
Maine - Special Statement , Air Quality Alert
Maryland - Air Quality Alert
Massachusetts - Special Statement , Air Quality Alert
Minnesota - Special Statement
Missouri - Flood Warning , Record Report , Public Information Statement
Nebraska - Flood Warning , Areal Flood Advisory
New Hampshire - Air Quality Alert
New Jersey - Air Quality Alert , Special Statement, Air Quality Alert
New Mexico - Record Report
New York - Air Quality Alert , Special Statement, Air Quality Alert , Special Statement , Record Report
North Carolina - Hurricane Statement
Oklahoma - Flood Warning , Record Report
Oregon - Freeze Warning
Pennsylvania - Special Statement
Rhode Island - Air Quality Alert
South Carolina - Tropical Storm Warning , Hurricane Statement , Coastal Hazard Statement
Tennessee - Special Statement
Texas - Flood Warning , Coastal Hazard Statement , Dense Fog Advisory , Record Report , Public Information Statement
Utah - Record Report
Vermont - Special Statement , Record Report
Virginia - Special Statement
West Virginia - Special Statement
Wisconsin - Special Statement
Wyoming - Flood Warning , Record Report
8,